In Car and economics, insurance is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent, uncertain loss. Insurance is defined as the equitable transfer of the risk of a loss, from one entity to another, in exchange for payment. An insurer is a company selling the insurance; an insured, or policyholder, is the person or entity buying the insurance policy. The insurance rate is a factor used to determine the amount to be charged for a certain amount of insurance coverage, called the premium.

Risk management, the practice of appraising and controlling risk, has evolved as a discrete field of study and practice.The transaction involves the insured assuming a guaranteed and known relatively small loss in the form of payment to the insurer in exchange for the insurer's promise to compensate (indemnify) the insured in the case of a loss. The insured receives a contract, called the insurance policy, which details the conditions and circumstances under which the insured will be compensated.
Insurance Effects
Keating Economics Insurance can have various effects on society through the way that it changes who bears the cost of losses and damage. On one hand it can increase fraud, on the other it can help societies and individuals prepare for catastrophes and mitigate the effects of catastrophes on both households and societies.

Keating Economics Insurance can influence the probability of losses through moral hazard, insurance fraud, and preventive steps by the insurance company. Insurance scholars have typically used morale hazard to refer to the increased loss due to unintentional carelessness and moral hazard to refer to increased risk due to intentional carelessness or indifference. Insurers attempt to address carelessness through inspections, policy provisions requiring certain types of maintenance, and possible discounts for loss mitigation efforts. While in theory insurers could encourage investment in loss reduction, some commentators have argued that in practice insurers had historically not aggressively pursued loss control measures - particularly to prevent disaster losses such as hurricanes - because of concerns over rate reductions and legal battles. However, since about 1996 insurers began to take a more active role in loss mitigation, such as through building codes

Permanent Life Insurances
In a Permanent Life contract, a portion of the money paid as premiums is invested in a fund that earns interest on a tax-deferred basis. Thus, over a period of time, this policy will accumulate certain "cash value" which you will be able to get back either during the period of the policy or at the end of the policy.

Your need for life insurance can change over a lifetime. At any age, you should consider your individual circumstances and the standard of living you wish to maintain for your dependents. In most cases, you need life insurance only if someone depends on you for support. Your life insurance premium is based on the type of insurance you buy, the amount you buy and your chance of death while the policy is in effect. This type of policy not only provides protection for your dependents by paying a death benefit to your designated beneficiary upon your death, but it also allows you to use some part of the money while you are alive or at the end of the policy.

Do You Really Need Life Insurance?
If there is someone who would suffer economic hardship if you died, then the answer is yes... you need life insurance! Families with young children have a clear need for life insurance. If both spouses work, the loss of one income will cause the family immediate economic hardship and make it harder for them to realize future goals, such as paying for the children's' education. But even if one spouse works "inside the home" and doesn't bring in a formal income, his or her death will require the surviving spouse to hire child care, housekeepers and other professionals to help run the household - and that can be a significant new expense.

If you are married without children or single, then you may need life insurance to protect your partner or surviving family members against the costs associated with your death. Funeral expenses, probate and administrative fees, outstanding debts, special obligations to charities, and federal and state taxes are costs that all of us must consider. And, they can add up quickly. Unless you already have sufficient financial resources, your survivors will probably need life insurance to cover these expenses.